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The last few weeks have been eventful.

I saw a Pain Specialist on the NHS a few weeks ago and it was a traumatic experience for me. I was not going to blog about it as it is a bit complicated but I will say that firstly I was very distressed by my level of cognitive function during (and in the days after) the hour-long appointment. I still have a very patchy recollection of what happened and what was said, complicated by my partner’s version of what he said (and what he meant by certain things) being different to mine, so in going over it together to clarify it I was further confused and my memory warped. Secondly, the man himself was quite strange and I found his style of communication and approach not to be one I could work with. I am still unsure what exactly he was offering me,  though I have been told by others who have been to similar things and by my CFS specialist that it is CBT-based stuff though he seemed to be dressing it up as something more. I was open to trying that for pain, which is why I went as I suspected that was what was on offer, but unfortunately he kept asking me questions and saying things that covered not just pain but my illness as well and I could not handle the overly psychological emphasis where that was concerned. He said a couple of things that were very dismissive of my physical illness and if he did not come from the “CFS is a false illness belief” school of thought he frankly should have enough nous to know it would be a sore point and make that clearer… he did not. I have been so scarred in the past that I cannot handle that kind of territory, partly as my cognitive problems mean I cannot challenge things that are said at the time or be assertive enough to make sure I am understanding things correctly if I am over-reacting. To get over this history and aversion even if he could help me with pain management would take a lot of work and feel like a fight, and I do not have the strength.

I have also just seen my CFS specialist. It has been over two years since I last saw him as I see the POTS specialist regularly so there is not really a need to see both. I wanted to talk to him about a few things. We talked about my neuropathic pain (something I did not get to ask the pain specialist about properly in the whole hour as he liked to talk and had his own agenda). I asked him why I have it, if it is common with ME/CFS, if it is a sign that I have fibromyalgia and if I can expect it to get worse (if it is degenerative).

His answers were: That is it part of the neurological changes that are responsible for the over-sensitivity to light, noise etc in pwME (he calls it CFS of course) and that this is just over-sensitivity to touch. I am very over-sensitive to touch, certainly, and cannot be touched much in everyday life, or only in certain places and in certain ways. The pain is triggered by touch, whether that be of air, fabric, moisture, heat, cold, my own hair or dead skin, etc etc, but it seems to me that touch-sensitivity and this pain are a bit different but neurologically they are obviously very connected… anyway, next question:

He says, yes, that yes it is common with CFS. I have never spoken to anyone with CFS that has these symptoms as extremely as I have, but maybe they do exist, or perhaps he does not realise how extreme my case is? Some people with Fibromyalgia seem to share these symptoms but again I have not spoken to anyone who has it exactly like I do… granted, he sees/knows more people than I do! (I also asked about my Trigeminal Neuralgia as that is also nerve pain I wondered if it is connected. He said it is not associated with CFS and it just something I happen to have and will continue to have on and off).

As for if it is Fibromyalgia (FM), he says that he sees FM and CFS to be like a piece of string with pain being predominant on one end and fatigue being predominant on the other and that people are somewhere along that spectrum. He said there has been one study which suggested they were distinct entities but he is not convinced. He says that many people with CFS have fibromyalgic pain to some extent. I would suggest the piece of string could be a loop as some people have both fatigue and pain pretty badly!

As for the degenerative nature of the neuropathic pain he says it will be worse when my condition is worse and improve when I am in better phases… no discussion of whether my condition in general could be degenerative, but he seems to think waxing and waning is the general pattern. I have been stuck in this bad phase a while though! Bring on the better phases…

He also said that I would probably not want to up my dose of Gabapentin much more than the level I am at… the Pain Specialist said it could go higher but that whatever I do, eventually my body will get used to any pain medication and the pain will be back how it was before. There’s a cheery thought. The Pain Specialist did talk about medication and said he will recommend some options to try when needed so that may be a useful outcome from that meeting.

I was happy with the CFS specialist appointment and his answers to my questions.

Interestingly the CFS specialist recommended a book by Jon Kabat-Zinn. I have ordered it. It is about mindfulness and coping with illness and pain I think, though I am not sure how specifically targetted to that. After a quick survey of facebook friends I thought it sounded worth looking into as people said he was good. One friend also mentioned Breathworks to me and the courses on Living Well with Pain and Illness look really interesting to me. I do not think I am well enough to attend the courses in person, but would prefer that, though they do do a telephone-based version. I am going to look into it.

I am reassured by my openness to this that I am not closed to the mind-body connection or to looking at my own behaviour in order to get the most out of my life limited by illness and disability. I do not know why I over-react to the CBT stuff which may in fact just be trying to do the same thing using a slightly different approach in the end. I cannot help feel though that with the CBT stuff the people offering it to me seem to want to use it to deny my illness, not to start from a basis of “yes, you are living with a physical, likely permanent and pretty severe illness, but let’s look at how you can live best with it,” but more like “You are focussing too much on your physical symptoms and making them worse, and frankly we think that much of it would disappear if you just did this CBT (and were open enough to it) and you would live a much more normal lfe.” I know that how we respond to our illness and pain, how we think and how we react can affect our experiences but there is a huge limit to the curative effects and this is the issue I have, I think; the basis and assumptions on which this is offered. The breathworks video I watched on the site showing an interview with the founder of the company shows that her attitude is much more about accepting the reality: I have pain, I have disability, I have illness and that is unlikely to change. Then we can move on to work with this reality.

Am I being over-sensitive to the Psychologist’s approach and denying myself something free and useful on the NHS? I just know it causes me so much stress to engage with it, it is probably not worth it anyway… it looks like I will be finding my own way.

One thing that came up in the Breathworks video is remembering a happy/pleasant experience in order to take yourself away from current distress. I tried it this morning when I woke up too early and was in tears in seconds. I have tried this before with similar effects. It seems that the grief is still just below the surface and will not go away despite having now been ill and supposedly processing this fact for twelve years! I think it is harder to grieve when things fluctuate and change and nothing is certain, or we grieve for what is lost, then we become worse and have to start the process all over again. That is how it feels anyway; constantly adjusting to a new reality. Well not constantly, as nothing much has changed lately, but quite often. My partner suggested thinking of something happy from my life now, rather than picturing something from “before”. I very wise suggestion and perhaps I need to choose something that is still possible, at least while it seems I am feeling so much grief.

I need to work on acceptance, though I do have quite a lot by now. I am not sure the grief necessarily leaves us just because we are accepting though? I certainly think acceptance is easier when we understand what is going on and I think I am getting a better understanding of how my neuropathic pain fits into the bigger picture now.

One thing that really made me angry in the Pain Specialist appointment was him asking about what I wanted to do with my life and how I saw the next decade etc. This always annoys me. How can I express in a sentence all that that question summons to the surface? How can I express how I get through each day and try not to make assumptions about the future? How can I endure sitting there and having my levels of acceptance and hope judged by another stranger who clearly has no idea what a loaded question he is asking? How can I genuinely answer a question I have been asked it too many times?

I answered after a long silence with a bit of waffle, a shrug and a “que sera, sera!” I was not functioning well cognitively and just could not come up with anything more lucid, but looking back that is how I feel: what will be, will be. I do not believe that hope will save me, I believe in acceptance. I may have hopes and dreams and they are important but I am not about to share them with him or anyone like him who cannot see the reality of my illness and is already judging me before I step into the room, or at least has not got proper knowledge of my illness on which to base his assessment.

Defensive? Probably. I am trying not to care and not to over-analyse myself, but that is also hard not to waste energy on… is my confidence another casualty?

Went to the hospital again today to see the POTS specialist.

Firstly she has started me on Gabapentin for pain and itching – she had mentioned it last time and I am so glad she was still keen for me to try it as I have read about it and talked to people who take it and it does seem a fit with the problems I am having. I asked her if it is basically that I am having symptoms like Fibromyalgia (FM); that it is neuropathic pain and she said yes, and that it is common with CFS and that an additional diagnosis would not help me (there are  additional treatments recommended for FM so there is no point).

This brings me to the POTS medications. There are no treatments recommended specifically for POTS, like ME/CFS and FM (or is there one for FM in the pipeline? I forget). She started me on a new drug last time which is an angina drug (Ivabradine) to slow my heart rate to see if that helps. I am unsure if it has helped but I think that it possibly has helped a bit. It has been hard to judge as it is a small dose and also there has been so much going on with my itching, pain and sleeplessness that I have barely been thinking about my POTS symptoms (but that may be a sign in itself that it is working!). But all this is now irrelevant as my GP has said I cannot take the drug as it is not a recommended treatment for my condition and it won’t fund it, whether it helps or not. Seeing as there are no drug treatments listed for POTS they are basically saying I will not be treated, even if the specialist thinks it might help. This leads to the conclusion that the only reason I AM being treated at all (I take Midodrine, an unlicensed drug that I get through the hospital) is ironically BECAUSE the drug is unlicensed so the specialist can give it to me (I think because it is part of research) and override the GPs who have complete control over what drugs can be prescribed. Apparently even in the US where I thought POTS was much more accepted and treated there are no drugs trialled and approved for it. I see again how very lucky I am  to be getting Midodrine. It seems ridiculous that a seriously disabling condition that can be easily tested for and monitored is not researched more widely.

I am happy to report that Gabapentin is an expensive drug (I want to make them suffer now, ha ha!) but that they cannot deny me that, as it is listed for neuropathic/nerve pain AND itching.  She said if it helps I can then cut down on the anti-histamines which would be good, I don’t want to take quite so many things! 

One good thing is that she is putting a note to the GP to try me on a sleep medication (I did not catch the name) if my sleep does not improve once the Gabapentin starts working, so it is nice to have that option if I need it, without having to wait for months for the next appointment to discuss this.

I asked if other GPs allow people to take the Ivabradine for POTS and she said my GP is the FIRST to deny the patient access to it when she has recommended it! I am shocked about this and asked how I could challenge it. She said I could go and talk to them, but apart from that there is little I can do, except change GP! I am not happy with my GP but I always thought maybe it would be the same anywhere. I would consider changing (as I have to get a taxi/lift to the existing one anyway, albeit a very short ride) but how would I know if  it would be any better before I got there? As I cannot say for sure that the Ivabradine really would help me (as I have not been allowed to give it a proper try) I do not have a very strong case to argue anyway… I also worry that a new GP would see that I had been refused and think I am going to be a troublesome new patient to have and not want me and my mammoth medical files transferred over to their practice. This is all about money.  I don’t think they can say no, but there is little point in moving if their attitude is as negative towards me as it is where I am. It is a concern in these economic times. I am unhappy that my GP seems to be saying no when others say yes to this drug. Should they have the power to choose, and operate a “postcode lottery”? As it is not the sanctioned use of the drug I suppose it is down to their discretion, but when there are no drugs approved for a condition where does that leave us? Without treatment is where. Apparently there is little interest in researching this rare condition (but would it be seen as so rare if people were actually diagnosed properly?). It it not about helping people who are suffering from the most disabling conditions, it is all about making money, after all.

 Or should I say ME/CFS/FM Awareness Day, as this year I want to talk about Fibromyalgia… even though I do not have this condition.

I suspect that those of us who do not have Fibromyalgia, even if we do have ME/CFS/CFIDS do not really know what exactly it is. I know a couple of people (not that well, admittedly) who have Fibromyalgia, and still had only a vague idea of what it involved.  My basic understanding went as far as “ME with more pain” and “warmer climates help”… Recently i have been having more intense and different (for me) pain and have suspected that i may be developing some Fibro-like symptoms, so decided to look into it further.

*Please note* I have not been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia, nor am i any kind of expert on the subject, but i will try to link to information that will help to explain it better than i can. I have conducted two interviews with people who have Fibromyalgia, I will link to them at the end of the post.

What is Fibromyalgia (FM)?

 (this text taken from here (as are the “differences” and “similarities” sections below))

FM is a malfunction of the central nervous system that causes disordered pain processing, and results in pain amplification. The main symptoms of FM include:

  • Widespread Pain
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep Disorders

Other symptoms that may occur include:

  • Chest Pain
  • Persistent Headaches, Migraines
  • T.M.J. (temporomandibular joint syndrome)
  • Mitral Valve Prolapse
  • I.B.S. (irritable bowel syndrome)
  • Vision Problems
  • Urinary Problems
  • Acid Reflux
  • Allergies
  • Dizziness
  • Numbness and Tingling
  • Sensitivity to cold or heat
  • Depression
  • R.L.S. (restless legs syndrome)
  • Chemical or Environmental Sensitivities
  • Impaired Balance or Coordination
  • Problems with Memory, Concentration and Cognitive Functioning

Are ME/CFS and FM basically the same illness?

After some internet research, the consensus seems to be that NO they are not the same illness, but that there are people who exhibit both sets of symptoms.  And there may be many connections between them. The similarities are:

  • Reduced Cerebral Blood Flow to the Cortex and Midbrain
  • HPA (hypothalamic pituitary axis) Suppression
  • Reduced Levels of Serotonin
  • Non-restorative Sleep
  • Reduced Levels of Growth Hormone
  • Evidence of a Genetic Component

I recently read online about research/theories of Central Sensitivity Syndromes (CSS). These are a collection of conditions which are linked by problems with the Central Nervous System and this leads to what they call “central sensitization”. The conditions which are considered under this umbrella are Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, among many others which we will recognise and often suffer from in tandem, such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Temporomandibular Disorders, Tension Headaches, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, and several others. I find this interesting and heartening that people are looking not only at biological/neurological factors for these illnesses but also the links between them. What continually frustrates me is when i get something new and it is treated in complete isolation to my existing conditions, when, to me it seems obvious there are connections to be made, not only in understanding them, but also potential in treating them. Click here to read the articles I refer to, start on page 12).

Talking about CSS may see a bit of an aside, but i think it is a new way to look at our illnesses and the links between them. It may lead to more effective pain management and treatment for people who have several of these painful conditions, rather than treating each one as a separate entity, with a drug/treatment for each. I have read concerns from people with ME/CFS that the pain then becomes the focus and the one thing treated and the rest of the illness will be ignored. I understand this, but I have found my symptoms of pain and discomfort to be ignored and they have gone unmanaged for so long, whilst getting steadily worse. I have found that sometimes for long periods my pain has taken over my life and prevented management of other problems, such as sleep, pacing, relaxation and so on. It needs to be looked at for those of us who have pain. I don’t think it is an either/or. I also read (somewhere) that the immune system has a role in Central Sensitization, so it may not be as unrelated to other non-pain symptoms as it first appears…

So, what are the differences between them?

  • FM is identified by 18 distinct tender points (designated points on the body that are painful when pressure is applied), while CFS/ME is distinguished by post-exertional malaise (deep fatigue and exhaustion following physical exertion, which lasts more than 24 hours).
  • Substance P (a neurotransmitter that sends pain signals) is elevated in FM but not in CFS/ME
  • RNaseL (a cellular antiviral enzyme) is frequently elevated in CFS/ME but not in FM
  • CFS/ME is often triggered by an infectious or flu-like illness, while FM is usually triggered by a severe physical or emotional trauma (for example, injury, illness, surgery, prolonged stress)

Exercise: One major difference (from ME/CFS) I have found when reading about FM is that exercise is recommended and is helpful in pain management and taking in some control over pain symptoms. I have recently read “Fibromyalgia: Simple Relief  Through Movement” by Stacie L. Bigelow (2000, John Wiley & Sons, Inc) as I was looking to find some simple stretches that are designed in a way that I could do them, and which might help me to manage some of my pain and muscular tension. She explains the thing I had heard about FM before; that it is a sleep disorder. In my recent internet searches I have not found it referred to in that way so much, and I wonder if it is an outdated view to characterise sleep problems as the root cause of the condition, rather than the Central Nervous System (I don’t know, I am speculating). However, from what she says, it does seem that much of the pain is caused by the lack of restorative sleep; that people with FM do not get into a certain phase of sleep which is when the body heals itself and repairs damage to tissue. She explains that when we use our muscles, they are damaged and this is the normal process which leads to strengthening: We use a muscle and when it repairs itself it prepares itself for being used again by repairing itself stronger than it was before, which is how we build muscle mass and strength. In FM the sleep is disturbed, and is not sufficient to repair the muscles as quickly as someone without FM, leading to greater pain after activity and often an avoidance of further activity, leading the muscles to seize up. A cycle of pain develops.

Even though i do not have an FM diagnosis, I think that some of these processes are going on for me. I got very motivated to do movement and activity when I read the book, and even started to entertain the idea of actual exercise! Then I remembered which body I was in and that I have ME and POTS, not FM, and it was just not going to be possible to take it that far. But I do think moving as much as we can within our limits has to be good. I sometimes think my weak bladder and the fact that I live in a house with stairs (though we do have a downstairs toilet, thankfully!) must be keeping me in a better state than if I was just sitting/lying completely still all day, rather than getting up fairly often to go to the toilet. It is not much, but it is something. I wonder how people who have both FM and ME/CFS manage to balance the pain and the pacing, it must be harder to decide when to move and when to rest when you have both.

Interestingly I have recently been taking a new night-time medication and the result is much better sleep and my muscular pain is much, much better. I really did not think my sleep was that bad (I was certainly getting enough hours) but it seems it was not good quality, despite all my efforts of sleep hygiene etc. I will certainly be paying much more attention to this link in future and talking to doctors if this medication ceases to work for sleep in future.

Two people I know with Fibromyalgia have kindly answered my interview questions, click here to see their answers.

Here are some websites to find out more about Fibromyalgia: (please feel free to add any others you know about/like in the comments section, thanks!)

http://fmcfsme.com/index.php

http://www.fmaware.org/site/PageServer?pagename=fibromyalgia 

http://cfidsselfhelp.org/library/about-fibromyalgia

http://www.ukfibromyalgia.com/

http://www.emotionalprocessing.org.uk/ (not specific to FM but may be of interest)

GIVEAWAY!!

If you would like my copy of Fibromyalgia: Simple Relief Through Movement, as mentioned above please leave a comment below and I will pick the winner at random (i may even use a hat!) at the end of May and contact you to arrange to post it to you. Please check back here at start of June to see who is the winner, just in case i cannot get your email from your comment!

I have found that the book is not really suitable for me as someone with the severity of ME that i have, but i will be copying the gentle stretches before i pass it on, as they do look possible. If you have FM and can manage your sleep to enable you to gradually tolerate more activity in your life, it is a motivating and sensible book written by someone with FM.

To read what other’s are blogging about for International ME/CFS/FM Awareness DAy 2010 click here!

These are interviews I did (by email) with two friends with FM as part of my blog for ME/CFS/FM Awareness Day 2010. They are in their own words. To read the main post, click here.

Interview One – Maggie:

I’m a 54 year old woman, divorced with two grown up sons.

How long have you had FM? How does it affect you now, what are your main symptoms and has it changed over time?

I’ve had fibromyalgia for almost 12 years. Since coming to live in Spain 5 years ago my condition has been a lot less of a burden. Largely as a result of the climate –sun and warmth make an enormous difference, which in turn means I am able to walk and move about more easily on a regular consistent basis and am therefore less stiff. In addition the pace of my life here is much slower, the general rhythm of the day is more relaxed. I also live on the coast which means I don’t have to deal on a day to day basis with hilly terrain, and living in a small flat cuts out the need for using stairs many times in a day, and is also a more manageable space re housework, cleaning etc.

The symptoms are many and variable – ongoing pain in some part of my body – somedays, knees, and hands other times neck and shoulders, sometimes one side of the body another day the other. The worst is the sense of fatigue that comes on very suddenly, and unexpectedly, often a result of overdoing things or as a direct result of stress and anxiety – even re minor things eg if washing machine breaks my stress levels are completely out of proportion with the incident  and any anxiety affects my body and its capability profoundly. I am certainly not as ill as I was 5 years ago but that is because I have drastically changed my lifestyle – when I return to cold weather or stressful situations my symptoms are exacerbated. It’s also hard to know how much the symptoms have changed because over time living with pain – I have learned to shut out sensations of pain, if I didn’t do that my life would be miserable.

What was happening at the time you became ill? Do you have a theory about what caused it/triggered it for you?

The onset of illness was very sudden and acute. However I was overworking and caught a virus which caused inflammatory arthritis in all joints of my body – I was confined to bed for many months unable to walk, move etc the doctors told me that the fibromyalgia was a direct result of the continued acute pain suffered during the course of this illness . So in my opinion the overworking/ stressed lifestyle lowered my bodily resistance making me victim to a nasty virus – I agree with the doctors that the virus caused arthritis and fibromyalgia set in as my body was unable to deal with the ongoing pain.

What changes have you made to your life to accommodate it?

I have completely revolutionized all aspects of my life. I have had to change not only the things I do and the manner in which I do them but also my attitude to life. I have had to become much more selfish in relation to my life, and much more discerning re what  I do and when I do it – I live alone now as it is easier for me not having to cope with the practical and emotional demands of other people —-I now please myself and am answerable to no-one. I have to work hard at always retaining a positive attitude. I have had to recognize, come to terms with and accept the severe limitations that the condition brings but to be happy within those limitations.

Is there anything that has helped you to cope with it? (Either prescribed medication or something else).

Acupuncture, hydrotherapy, gentle regular non aerobic exercise eg walking cycling swimming. And plenty of rest. Counselling helped me enormously to come to terms with what I couldn’t change and the strength to change what I could. As for prescribed medication eg ant inflammatories, analgesics, sleeping medication – I personally now only resort to taking medication if it is an emergency as the long term toxic effects of ongoing analgesia are in my opinion counterproductive. When in pain I try everything from application of heat or cold, yoga, just lying and resting and waiting….

How do you understand it and how do you describe/explain it to others?

It’s a complex syndrome which affects the nervous system and pain control mechanism of the body, its also a metabolic disorder in that the muscles burn up ATP very fast hence creating the symptom of fatigue.

How closely do you think it is related to ME/CFS, if you are familiar with what that condition involves? What do you see as distinct/different?

I think there is a definite relation between these types of disorder not so much in the symptomology as in the cause.

What other diagnosis/conditions do you have alongside FM? Do you think they are related to each other?

I think I answered this re having low resistance  virus arthritis = ongoing pain = fibromyalgia develops as a result.

When and how were you diagnosed? Did you know what FM was before that? Did you have to fight to be diagnosed or was it straightforward? Did you match all the tender points? Do you think these are a good indicator of having FM?

 I was diagnosed more than a year after I became ill. I had never heard of the condition before. I think I was lucky that one day I had the fortune to be seen by a hospital doctor who knew about the condition – once the diagnosis was made – I could then understand what my body was going through. Yes I do match all the tender points – and yes I think they are evidently a good indicator of FM

Are there any good web sites/other resources that you would recommend to people wanting to know more about FM?

In the early stages of the illness I found the British Fibromyalgia web site very helpful and their printed information and leaflets were invaluable in helping family and friends  understand what you were going through. I would say find as much info as you can – learn to undersatand the mechanics of the illness and accept that life cannot continue being the same you have to change irrevocably and only you can determine whether that change is a positive one or a negative one.

Is there anything else you would like to say about life with FM?

You have it. There’s no cure. Learn to live with it. Do everything you can to be as comfortable and happy as you can whenever and as often as you can. Don’t let it defeat you psychologically and spiritually.

Interview Two – Jo:

How long have you had FM? How does it affect you now, what are your main symptoms and has it changed over time?

I think I’ve had FM for a very long time. Sometime in my twenties I realised that everywhere on my body hurt if I pressed it. In my late twenties I started to get muscular pain after small exertion. I was always at the doctor’s or the osteopath. But even earlier, in my teens I can remember being in agony after exercise and wondered why everyone else didn’t seem to be as affected. I put it down to not being very fit.

Now, my main symptoms are fatigue, muscular stiffness, joint stiffness and pain in the most used areas – across my shoulders and lower back. If I get into a good place with my energy levels and do too much I can be in a great deal of pain with my whole skeleton feeling like it is lit up. Thankfully that doesn’t happen too often.

What was happening at the time you became ill? Do you have a theory about what caused it/triggered it for you?

For me, stress seems to be the trigger. I have always been very stressed and have had emotional difficulties all my life. I store tension in my body and have problems releasing emotion.  If I have massage or other body therapies it can be upsetting for me as memories and emotion can be released that way.

What changes have you made to your life to accommodate it?

Well, the fibro on its own wasn’t too bad for functioning. I had to be careful about sitting at a computer for long periods of time, spent a lot of money on osteopaths and massage, tried to make sure I kept supple through swimming and pilates and so on. It was when the fatigue really kicked in that the problems started. I had to give up work. Everything changed.

Is there anything that has helped you to cope with it? (Either prescribed medication or something else).

I used to drink alcohol which is a great muscle relaxant, but that has its own problems. At one point I used to get strong, codeine based painkillers from the doctor, and developed a bit of a habit. Not a good way to carry on.  Once I had a diagnosis it became easier and I stopped self-medicating. Now I take low-dose amitriptyline and low dose SSRI antidepressant. The two together really help pain and sleep. Paracetamol is good for bad days and can help stop me building up into a pain crisis. Prevention is much better than cure and I’m much better when I do my Pilates stretches in the morning.  I also regularly do a body scan meditation for relaxation, and I rest three times a day for at least half an hour.

How do you understand it and how do you describe/explain it to others?

I don’t generally explain the pain. I’m more usually trying to explain my fatigue and walking difficulties as they are much more visible. Sometimes my partner asks me if I’m ok and I just mutter ‘in pain’. It’s so familiar to me that I accept it like breathing. It’s just part of me. I understand it as a holding on of tension, my body’s complaint against having to do the work of my faulty emotional processing.

How closely do you think it is related to ME/CFS, if you are familiar with what that condition involves? What do you see as distinct/different?

I think they are one and the same; all part of the same continuum. The FM is, for me, at the sharp end of the wedge. It belongs more to the earlier onset of my ME/CFS. The fatigue, or thick end of the wedge is where my body has been holding this tension for so long it is having to stop. I know when I’m improving because I get less fatigue and more pain.

What other diagnosis/conditions do you have alongside FM? Do you think they are related to each other?

Hmm, let’s see. Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Osteoarthritis, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, Anxiety, Generalised Anxiety Disorder.  I feel they all stem from the same cause which is extreme and repeated stress.

When and how were you diagnosed? Did you know what FM was before that? Did you have to fight to be diagnosed or was it straightforward? Did you match all the tender points? Do you think these are a good indicator of having FM?

I was just on the cusp of moving into the fatigue stage of my illness. I met someone who had just received a diagnosis of fibromyalgia and whose symptoms exactly matched my own. It was a further four years before I could get a GP to even entertain the idea I had FMS. A rheumatologist I saw did not ‘recognise the diagnosis’. After I moved to a new area I asked to be referred to a rheumy I knew was sympathetic. He wouldn’t see me because I had fibromyalgia and they could do nothing for me! I burst into tears in front of my new GP and tried to explain I had diagnosed myself and it was an official diagnosis I wanted. To cut the wait and frustration I paid to go and see the same guy who had refused to see me. Through that meeting I got my diagnosis of FMS/CFS and a referral to an ME clinic. He quickly checked my tender points and said I wasn’t too bad. It wasn’t till I left his office the pain kicked in from just having them pressed. I don’t know if they are a good indicator or not. Probably a better indicator is widespread, long-term pain with a normal rheumatology blood test.

Are there any good web sites/other resources that you would recommend to people wanting to know more about FM?

Actually, there is so much out there, so many different theories and protocols, forums and blogs, for anyone new to this I’d tell them to go with what suits them. This website on emotional processing produced by a team of researchers in Dorset, UK, is my touchstone although it’s not specifically about FMS. http://www.emotionalprocessing.org.uk/index.htm

A useful book is “Fibromyalgia and Muscle Pain” by Leon Chaitow

My feeling is that sustained emotional stress, especially in childhood, results in real physical symptoms and the breakdown of metabolic systems in the body. My experience of it is that some recovery, even total recovery, is possible.

Is there anything else you would like to say about life with FM?

It’s real, it hurts, it can be very disabling, not to mention frightening at times.

Please note, this post contains some moaning but it does end on a fairly positive note!!

It seems that i started to take the progesterone pill almost 2 years ago (it will be two years at the end of June, see post from the time). I have just had my blood lipids checked for the second time, and while i was there i found out more about the results from the test i had last June. I was told at the time that my cholesterol was “a bit high” but at 5.2 or 5.4 (i have forgotten exactly) it did not seem too bad. Today i found out the actual problem is that my HDL cholesterol is actually too low (0.8 where it should be over 1.1 for a woman). I apologise for not knowing what these measurements mean or are measurements of, that was not discussed with me. Only i was told it is the difference between the two amounts which is bad, rather than just a case of one being dramatically too high as i was initially told. The HDL kind that i am low in is the one that protects from heart disease, so it does not sound too good. I will have an appointment with the doctor soon as the new test results have come to discuss if things have changed and what it all means.

The reason i am being tested is that being on the type of pill i am on (it is not the same as the progesterone mini-pill, it is slightly different, and works to stop my periods completely) can affect my lipids profile. Progestins do that apparently. I am not sure if they ever tested my lipids before i was on the pill to make it clearer whether this imbalance is directly due to the pill, or actually due to my illness in general. Apparently low HDL can be associated with certain conditions. I wonder if ME is one of them, especially seeing as i have read (somewhere) that heart-related deaths are higher amongst us, not that i want to scaremonger without evidence! Anyway i will get my results in a few days and see if anything had changed/improved this year. If not i may have to stop taking the pill – not an attractive prospect with everything else i am dealing with at the moment.

I am having various (ongoing) issues in my pelvic region, mainly pain-related and bladder related (possible interstitial cystitis – i am reading up on it – it often accompanies Fibromyalgia, IBS etc) and i wonder if the progesterone pill helps or hinders that. Also i have bad itching which continues to plague me (not long until my dermatology appointment, thankfully) and i wonder if hormones could play a part in that. Both are unlikely but i am getting very confused about what could be affecting what at the moment. I also am having a lot more (constant and worse in intensity) back pain and muscular tension which is also an ongoing problem and with my skin, muscles, pelvic area and all sorts all causing at times serious discomfort i am wondering if i have developed Fibromyalgia-type symptoms… I certainly have tender points on my skin (jump when lightly touched) but are they in the right places?! It all seems possibly connected: the itch, the bladder, the other pain… maybe my brain (pain) signals are just all a bit wrong – i just hope that the doctors can intelligently help me to understand it and suggest medications that may help with more than one thing, so that i don’t end up taking many more drugs, overloading my poor body and wondering what side-effects are coming from what. Already the POTS specialist wonders if Midodrine is contributing to my itch – i really don’t want to have to stop taking it to find out…

I do want to try to find some answers, even if i don’t really want to take more drugs as things just seem constantly a struggle, the itch has really got me down and just feels like the last straw on top of all the other symptoms i have. It affects my sleep and rest in the day, creates a stress reaction which is very physical and draining and it has really been getting me down. How can i manage my basic condition when i have all this discomfort? I am certainly not getting out of the house much and my quality of life feels almost as low as it has ever been, though i find this hard to measure. I really have been feeling the last year that although the Midodrine has helped to control my POTS symptoms to some extent; they are still present, progress has plateaued and other things have come in to take their place to disable me. The years just pass and so many ongoing symptoms do not seem to be addressed; like my back problems which i have had from day one, literally. I cannot believe that a) there is nothing that could help and b) that spinal health will not affect my overall health, particularly as many problems i have a neurological and the spine is pretty important in carrying messages etc from the brain… This is a subject for another post, and i start to ramble – just needed a little rant!!

Good things: my mum is visiting tomorrow, so i can have a moan, watch her weed my garden, have some fun, and be distracted from it all for a few days – i am really looking forward to that 🙂

I had three visitors last week (one, then a couple) and it was a full on social week for me with three evenings (had a break in between) with talking and catching up. It felt quite strange in a way and i have lost some confidence in face-to-face social interaction (except with family etc) but i really enjoyed it, coped pretty well energy-wise and felt ok to interact most of the time (and i want more! I resisted the urge to chain them up and keep them here). I did have a major crushingly tight headache which lasted about 3 days solid and other flare-ups as a result of the exertion, but i feel it was worth it for the pleasant distraction from my woes and a great break from the usual routine. I certainly can’t visit anyone else at the moment, so i may try to encourage people to come to me, though it is always a gamble and a certain amount of stress/pressure. Well, we are all accustomed to the “no pain, no gain” way of life, eh?

ME/CFS Awareness

ME/CFS Awareness

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