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The last few weeks have been eventful.

I saw a Pain Specialist on the NHS a few weeks ago and it was a traumatic experience for me. I was not going to blog about it as it is a bit complicated but I will say that firstly I was very distressed by my level of cognitive function during (and in the days after) the hour-long appointment. I still have a very patchy recollection of what happened and what was said, complicated by my partner’s version of what he said (and what he meant by certain things) being different to mine, so in going over it together to clarify it I was further confused and my memory warped. Secondly, the man himself was quite strange and I found his style of communication and approach not to be one I could work with. I am still unsure what exactly he was offering me,  though I have been told by others who have been to similar things and by my CFS specialist that it is CBT-based stuff though he seemed to be dressing it up as something more. I was open to trying that for pain, which is why I went as I suspected that was what was on offer, but unfortunately he kept asking me questions and saying things that covered not just pain but my illness as well and I could not handle the overly psychological emphasis where that was concerned. He said a couple of things that were very dismissive of my physical illness and if he did not come from the “CFS is a false illness belief” school of thought he frankly should have enough nous to know it would be a sore point and make that clearer… he did not. I have been so scarred in the past that I cannot handle that kind of territory, partly as my cognitive problems mean I cannot challenge things that are said at the time or be assertive enough to make sure I am understanding things correctly if I am over-reacting. To get over this history and aversion even if he could help me with pain management would take a lot of work and feel like a fight, and I do not have the strength.

I have also just seen my CFS specialist. It has been over two years since I last saw him as I see the POTS specialist regularly so there is not really a need to see both. I wanted to talk to him about a few things. We talked about my neuropathic pain (something I did not get to ask the pain specialist about properly in the whole hour as he liked to talk and had his own agenda). I asked him why I have it, if it is common with ME/CFS, if it is a sign that I have fibromyalgia and if I can expect it to get worse (if it is degenerative).

His answers were: That is it part of the neurological changes that are responsible for the over-sensitivity to light, noise etc in pwME (he calls it CFS of course) and that this is just over-sensitivity to touch. I am very over-sensitive to touch, certainly, and cannot be touched much in everyday life, or only in certain places and in certain ways. The pain is triggered by touch, whether that be of air, fabric, moisture, heat, cold, my own hair or dead skin, etc etc, but it seems to me that touch-sensitivity and this pain are a bit different but neurologically they are obviously very connected… anyway, next question:

He says, yes, that yes it is common with CFS. I have never spoken to anyone with CFS that has these symptoms as extremely as I have, but maybe they do exist, or perhaps he does not realise how extreme my case is? Some people with Fibromyalgia seem to share these symptoms but again I have not spoken to anyone who has it exactly like I do… granted, he sees/knows more people than I do! (I also asked about my Trigeminal Neuralgia as that is also nerve pain I wondered if it is connected. He said it is not associated with CFS and it just something I happen to have and will continue to have on and off).

As for if it is Fibromyalgia (FM), he says that he sees FM and CFS to be like a piece of string with pain being predominant on one end and fatigue being predominant on the other and that people are somewhere along that spectrum. He said there has been one study which suggested they were distinct entities but he is not convinced. He says that many people with CFS have fibromyalgic pain to some extent. I would suggest the piece of string could be a loop as some people have both fatigue and pain pretty badly!

As for the degenerative nature of the neuropathic pain he says it will be worse when my condition is worse and improve when I am in better phases… no discussion of whether my condition in general could be degenerative, but he seems to think waxing and waning is the general pattern. I have been stuck in this bad phase a while though! Bring on the better phases…

He also said that I would probably not want to up my dose of Gabapentin much more than the level I am at… the Pain Specialist said it could go higher but that whatever I do, eventually my body will get used to any pain medication and the pain will be back how it was before. There’s a cheery thought. The Pain Specialist did talk about medication and said he will recommend some options to try when needed so that may be a useful outcome from that meeting.

I was happy with the CFS specialist appointment and his answers to my questions.

Interestingly the CFS specialist recommended a book by Jon Kabat-Zinn. I have ordered it. It is about mindfulness and coping with illness and pain I think, though I am not sure how specifically targetted to that. After a quick survey of facebook friends I thought it sounded worth looking into as people said he was good. One friend also mentioned Breathworks to me and the courses on Living Well with Pain and Illness look really interesting to me. I do not think I am well enough to attend the courses in person, but would prefer that, though they do do a telephone-based version. I am going to look into it.

I am reassured by my openness to this that I am not closed to the mind-body connection or to looking at my own behaviour in order to get the most out of my life limited by illness and disability. I do not know why I over-react to the CBT stuff which may in fact just be trying to do the same thing using a slightly different approach in the end. I cannot help feel though that with the CBT stuff the people offering it to me seem to want to use it to deny my illness, not to start from a basis of “yes, you are living with a physical, likely permanent and pretty severe illness, but let’s look at how you can live best with it,” but more like “You are focussing too much on your physical symptoms and making them worse, and frankly we think that much of it would disappear if you just did this CBT (and were open enough to it) and you would live a much more normal lfe.” I know that how we respond to our illness and pain, how we think and how we react can affect our experiences but there is a huge limit to the curative effects and this is the issue I have, I think; the basis and assumptions on which this is offered. The breathworks video I watched on the site showing an interview with the founder of the company shows that her attitude is much more about accepting the reality: I have pain, I have disability, I have illness and that is unlikely to change. Then we can move on to work with this reality.

Am I being over-sensitive to the Psychologist’s approach and denying myself something free and useful on the NHS? I just know it causes me so much stress to engage with it, it is probably not worth it anyway… it looks like I will be finding my own way.

One thing that came up in the Breathworks video is remembering a happy/pleasant experience in order to take yourself away from current distress. I tried it this morning when I woke up too early and was in tears in seconds. I have tried this before with similar effects. It seems that the grief is still just below the surface and will not go away despite having now been ill and supposedly processing this fact for twelve years! I think it is harder to grieve when things fluctuate and change and nothing is certain, or we grieve for what is lost, then we become worse and have to start the process all over again. That is how it feels anyway; constantly adjusting to a new reality. Well not constantly, as nothing much has changed lately, but quite often. My partner suggested thinking of something happy from my life now, rather than picturing something from “before”. I very wise suggestion and perhaps I need to choose something that is still possible, at least while it seems I am feeling so much grief.

I need to work on acceptance, though I do have quite a lot by now. I am not sure the grief necessarily leaves us just because we are accepting though? I certainly think acceptance is easier when we understand what is going on and I think I am getting a better understanding of how my neuropathic pain fits into the bigger picture now.

One thing that really made me angry in the Pain Specialist appointment was him asking about what I wanted to do with my life and how I saw the next decade etc. This always annoys me. How can I express in a sentence all that that question summons to the surface? How can I express how I get through each day and try not to make assumptions about the future? How can I endure sitting there and having my levels of acceptance and hope judged by another stranger who clearly has no idea what a loaded question he is asking? How can I genuinely answer a question I have been asked it too many times?

I answered after a long silence with a bit of waffle, a shrug and a “que sera, sera!” I was not functioning well cognitively and just could not come up with anything more lucid, but looking back that is how I feel: what will be, will be. I do not believe that hope will save me, I believe in acceptance. I may have hopes and dreams and they are important but I am not about to share them with him or anyone like him who cannot see the reality of my illness and is already judging me before I step into the room, or at least has not got proper knowledge of my illness on which to base his assessment.

Defensive? Probably. I am trying not to care and not to over-analyse myself, but that is also hard not to waste energy on… is my confidence another casualty?

yes, dangerous territory here, but lately i have been thinking of things that i would like to do and places i would like to go.

This is not “a list of things i will do when i am well” it is just a list of things i want to do (both seem pointless really). The fact that i would need to be much more well to do them is besides the point, i can’t help what i want and what i (would)enjoy, however out of reach they all seem to be.

A few things have set me thinking recently, partly hearing what my (healthy) friends are doing over xmas and new year and realising (again) how far away from being able to do these things i am; and partly thinking about my birthday which is a few weeks after xmas and what we could do to celebrate has made me a) think about what things are possible and b) what things i would really like to be doing. There was the suggestion of going away somewhere nearby for a long weekend  as we often have gone somewhere at this time of year and i looked at options but soon realised that either they were beyond me and likely to be depressingly hard to cope with and therefore not much fun or such a compromise that it would just remind me of how limited my options are. So we are back to playing it by ear and perhaps going out for an afternoon if i feel able to try something. I am researching possibilities for different levels of adventure/ability.

Anyway, back to the list, in no particular order and i am sure missing lots of things out!

  • Go to Cornwall
  • Go to Moray Firth to try to see the dolphins (second time lucky?)
  • Go to Plockton & Skye again
  • Visit Friends in Barcelona, Australia, Wales, elsewhere in England (more than one!) – yes i am inviting myself…
  • Go to Kew Gardens, Natural History Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, Chelsea Physic Garden, and many other places in London i have yet to discover I am sure
  • Go up in a hot air balloon
  • Study something creative, preferably a mixed course of arts/crafts/photography/design/writing etc
  • Study horticulture at Kew? Not sure if i really want to go the whole hog on this but how cool would it be?
  • Go up into a tree top with ropes and harness
  • Go somewhere wild and beautiful and be able to walk around all day taking pictures/drawing and soaking it all in
  • Be able to work on something (artistic project) all day/week and become totally absorbed in it, lose myself and also to produce something that means something to me
  • Have a party and have lots of people who would come and have a laugh and have interesting conversations all night
  • Do some things as a couple: meals out, holidays, days out, cinema, pubs, live music, anything fun really that isn’t sitting watching tv
  • DIY and household jobs – oh, just to get stuck in!
  • and many more that my brain can’t even contemplate right now…

I have avoided posts like this before, though i have read ones that others have written. I suppose i am feeling low and just wondering when i will be able to accept this properly. Will i always struggle emotionally and feel i am missing out on “the life i could have had”? I am not sure it even IS that any more, maybe i am just wanting more that i am getting, and that seems wrong: I should be focussing on the good things i do have and it annoys me when i can’t just do that. It all seems such old territory but it still comes over me in waves, even if i am not grieving so keenly for my healthy self as i have in the past. I think the last few months have been perhaps harder than i expected and that has taken its toll. I find myself questioning if it IS this bad or am i somehow being a drama queen? There is also a sense of unreality and distancing myself from how bad things are, which i probably a protective mechanism but i feel concerned for my mental health when everyday experiences become surreal.

As my mum says: “sometimes i think i think too much!”.

Yesterday, i went to see the POTS specialist! It was a positive experience, and although i have realised that i have been pinning a lot of hopes on her and her potential treatments for me, i have not lost that hope since speaking to her. It is the first time anyone has really tried to help me with medication (except painkillers/antidepressants which the majority of people will take at some time), which is the way many illnesses are treated and managed, but to someone with CFS/ME it feels very novel.

She said to me that half of those with POTS experience ME-like symptoms of weakness, fatigue etc and about 27% of people she sees with ME have POTS. I said “oh i am one of the lucky ones to have both” in a sarky way, and she said “well yes in a way you are as it means we can offer your some medication to help manage it.” So if they are not completely distinct entities, it could be said that i have the type of ME that lends itslef to POTS and that there are things that can be tried to improve my quality of life… although my first thought was that she was putting a very positive spin on the fact that as i have both it is a sign that my illness is on the more severe side of the spectrum in the first place! Take your pick! 

I had similar tests to those i had before and again my blood pressure was low and my heart rate was very high on standing – it was 152 beats per minute at one point! They always ask me how i feel when this is happening, and it is quite funny, as i feel ok, just a little lightheaded but it is so normal to me now that i think i have forgotten what it feels like to stand normally. I tell them i feel ok, and they look very doubtful! They only make me stand there for two minutes, i think any longer and i would struggle as i do notice i am swaying more as time goes on and my lower legs tingle and feel heavy.

So they did the tests, and then i spoke to the specialist who is really nice (as is everyone in the unit, it seems). She has given me Midodrine, a Vasoconstrictor, at a low dose to start with. I have taken one yesterday and one this morning and so far, no bad reaction! There are not meant to be many bad side effects, especially on a low dose, but i know i am quite sensitive to drugs so i am always worried about side effects. The ones to look out for are all things i experience anyway, so it may not be obvious unless a big reaction. The doctor says that minor side effects should be temporary anyway. Also it is good as i can still take the painkillers and sleeping tablets that i sometimes take as they don’t affect each other… result!

Although this drug is obviously quite a serious drug, and is recommended long term only if it has a marked improvement for people whose quality of life has been greatly reduced by POTS, i feel that it will be so worth it if it helps me. My quality of life in terms of being able to care for myself and get out and about has been so much reduced over the last three years and has felt like a steady decline, that any turn around in that trend is worth some long term risks. I feel lucky that unlike many chronically ill and disabled people i have not had to pollute my body with drugs just to stay alive, or get through each day, regardless of the side effects and the impact that may have later (and i have a prospect of “later”). Because ME is not (seen as) a terminal illness, at least, most people live with it, even severely, for decades; there is always a feeling that we want to preserve what we have got, health-wise and not jeopardise the future by taking risks now, in case we get that miraculous recovery and because we don’t know how long we will have to endure this if we don’t. But it gets to a point where the implications of living such a limited life are also so “dangerous” on many levels that any drug that can help is welcome. That is how i feel now. Not that this one seems particularly risky but it makes me think of these issues. The prospect of taking a drug every day for the forseeable future is strange for me. I only started taking the contraceptive pill recently and that was enough of a decision, although i am so pleased i am on it now. I realise this is a priviledged position, but it also comes from the fact that there are no drug treatments like this for ME.

It is interesting to compare the way i have been diagnosed and treated for two conditions that are very similar in cause (often viral, but may be other factors) and which affect very similar bodily functions (autonomic nervous system). No psychologist assessments so far for POTS! Just go in, have a test, and take some tablets!

It seems that many of my worst symptoms could be attributed to POTS, so there is great potential for improvement, if we can find a drug which works for me…

Top of my list would be: ability to stand up for more than a few seconds/minutes which is variable and unpredictable, ability to walk for more than a few minutes without making myself feel very ill for hours or being worried if i can make it back to the front door/taxi, not having hot flushes many times a day, not having blurred vision, not having such constant pain and tension in neck and shoulders and also bad headaches practically every day… there are many others but that would be a start and don’t want to ask for the moon on a stick… so no pressure then doc?!?

Interesting what she said about pain, as she said i may have trigger points (this is known as myofascial pain, and is what people with fibromyalgia typically have, and many people with ME have it to some extent as well. I have just bought a book about it, The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook, so i hope to work on my trigger points soon as well, once i have found the energy to find them and understand the book!), but she said that there is a pattern of pain associated with POTS which she called “coathanger pain” which is pain across mid back, shoulders, up the neck into the head… this is my exact pain pattern! She says it is caused by the muscles being starved of oxygen as blood flow in upper body is limited by POTS and the larger muscles show most distress. No wonder my brain hurts!! ha ha.

So my brain is literally hurting now and i am sure there is more to say about POTS but it will have to wait. All i will say to close is that i had no idea how much the themes of my first blog post on Hope and Acceptance would be so much the themes of the whole blog, it seems it always comes back to this for me. Now i have some Hope again (the most i have had since early on in the illness when they were still telling me i could recover and i still half belived them) and it is very dangerous territory… but maybe i am becoming more experienced in coping when hopes are dashed? i “hope” so!!!!

Well, this is my first post… on my first blog… it is also my first day of taking D-Ribose…

A friend of mine bought me a book called “From Fatigued to Fantastic” by Dr Teitlebaum and she has been taking it for 3 weeks so far (see her blog: http://chronicallyme.wordpress.com/. I had heard of D-Ribose before, in Dr Sarah Myhill’s CFS/ME book: http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/articles.cfm?subject=Fatigue and thought what do i have to lose?

I have been so full of despair in recent weeks but after reading the book i do feel a sense of Hope returning, and am pleased to be doing something constructive… although it is mixed with the feeling that i will not be able to fully try everything in the book (which is american) as a whole section is about hormones and taking hormonal supplements and getting certain tests done, which i doubt i can get via the NHS, and i don’t want to mess about with that kind of stuff unsupervised… I am hopefully going to see a hormone specialist soon as I have noticed quite dramatic fluctuations in my symptoms based on my monthly cycle recently and my doc did not know what to do about it, so maybe i can talk to the specialist about the book and it’s contents then… finger’s crossed they are open minded.

I have ordered lots of expensive nutritional supplements, including the D-ribose so that is a good start. I will be happy to get even a small improvement in quality of life as recently my life has become very small & to get further than ten minutes from my house by foot or car is a rare and amazing event. I have been really struggling to get through each day. Things have seemed to be just getting slowly worse and worse and i would really like to see a change in direction!

I feel i have been living without much Hope recently and i am unsure if that has been good for me. I can’t help but have a bit of an antagonistic relationship with hope these days: it seems at odds with Acceptance somehow.

Up until i became too ill to work again i felt i was on a very slow path to recovery as i had never properly relapsed like others seemed to; once i did i had to face the fact that after having this illness for 7 years there was a chance that i would always have it.

It seems obvious, but up until this point (when i asked my specialist straight out how many people who had been ill this long got fully better again and he said something along the lines of “not many – you will probably always be affected by it but may improve a bit”) all medical and other people had said to me that “most people get better”. In fact only about 10% of people with ME totally recover i read recently, many others improve to a good level of functionning but not to previous levels of health and about 20% stay seriously disabled, or even decline in health. (this is just from memory so don’t quote me!).

Why do medical professionals continuously say i will get better? Do they think i need to believe that and need to keep Hope? (This is especially galling when they only offer “Lifestyle Management” and don’t seem open to even trying certain tests or treatments which could help). After 9 years some of them still say it. It is the easy thing to say, but i feel it is also important to accept my life for what it is and not be waiting to be well to live it. I try to live it as well as i can within my limits, as i don’t know how i will be tomorrow or next year. Things could get (and have got) worse!

So, i had never given up on Hope completely as i want to be well with all by heart and soul, but maybe my hopes are smaller now. I just want to be able to get out of the house a bit more, be able to socialise more, be able to cope with short drives and be able to visit friends and family on the train occasionally… These things when i read them don’t seem small at all but they would be nice, wouldn’t they?

Dr T – i hope you know what you are talking about… you got my hopes up and i don’t need them dashed again…

ME/CFS Awareness

ME/CFS Awareness

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